School district consolidation is a striking phenomenon.

The Governor’s office notes that the incentive model has been tried in the past with only limited success, presumably leaving the state with forced consolidation as the primary method.

There are several considerations with the school consolidation issue that do not seem to have gotten the attention of the decision makers, or perhaps they would just rather not talk about them.

By 2006-07, the number of districts had dropped to 13,862, a decline of 88 percent.

The rate of consolidation has slowed in recent years, but at least a few districts consolidate every year in many states.

Illinois Governor Pat Quinn and the state’s legislators are considering the consolidation of school districts in order to save the state money.

Quinn has stated that there are 270 school superintendents who make salaries higher than that of the Governor. Governor Sheila Simon in charge of this effort, due to her experience as an educator and concern for the school system.

In the 2014-15 school year there were 1.7 million, or about 5.2 percent fewer students. Jim Christiana, R- Beaver, pointed out that Pennsylvania has more than 7,000 full-time administrators in its schools.

He applauded one of the resolution's goals "to reduce administrative overhead."Not all lawmakers were sold. Will Tallman, R- Adams, said he was not sure the study would get the results Vereb and others want.

House Education Committee votes unanimously Monday on a resolution that asks for a legislative study on the pros and cons of consolidating some for the state’s 500 school districts.

(Colt Shaw / The Morning Call) HARRISBURG —In an effort to trim taxpayer costs, a Montgomery County lawmaker has entered a long line of legislators looking to merge some of the state's 500 school districts.

Illinois Senate President John Cullerton is on record as favoring the addition of incentives to sweeten the deal for local districts that are merging.