The Year Jesus’s Ministry Began If Jesus, as the Gospels seem to indicate, began his ministry not long after John, then based on the calculations above, the earliest date for Jesus’s baptism would be in late .

The night before, on Thursday evening, Jesus ate a Passover meal with the Twelve (Mark ), his “Last Supper.” In the Pharisaic-rabbinic calendar commonly used in Jesus’s day, Passover always falls on the fifteenth day of Nisan (Exodus 12:6), which begins Thursday after sundown and ends Friday at sundown. For this reason, some have postulated a co-regency (joint rule) of Tiberius and Augustus during the last few years of Augustus’s reign.

However, there is no reliable ancient historical evidence for such co-regency.

We all know that this happened in Jerusalem in the first century. The Jewish Encyclopedia states: Friday, as the forerunner of Shabbat, is called "' Ereb Shabbat" (The Eve of Sabbath). If he says, "We're celebrating Passover today," and it's a day earlier than most people, they'd just go with that.

That separates Jesus from mythical pagan deities, who were supposed to live in places or times that none could specify. The term "'ereb" admits of two meanings: "evening" and "admixture" (Ex. 38); and "' Ereb Shabbat" accordingly denotes the day on the evening of which Sabbath begins, or the day on which food is prepared for both the current and the following days, which latter is Sabbath. (Note that he made other modifications to the ceremony, such as instituting the Eucharist in the midst of it.) And there are other solutions.

But that does not make it unknowable or unimportant.

To be clear, the Bible does not explicitly specify the precise date of Jesus’s crucifixion and it is not an essential salvation truth.The research confirmed that two major earthquakes hit the area specified, one during the period between 26 BCE and 36 CE, and could be the one referred to in the Gospel of Matthew.However, the earthquake data alone doesn't fully confirm the date.Williams, Schwab, and Brauer point out that the earthquake implied in the gospel could be allegorical, referring to the earthquake that occurred sometime before or after the crucifixion.This earthquake would have been powerful enough to break apart the sediments of Ein Gedi but not enough to have warranted "a still extant and extra-biblical historical record." “If the last possibility is true, this would mean that the report of an earthquake in the Gospel of Matthew is a type of allegory,” they write in the International Geology Review.The Year John the Baptist’s Ministry Began Luke implies that John the Baptist began his public ministry shortly before Jesus did, and he gives us a historical reference point for when the Baptist’s ministry began: “In . “The fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar” sounds like a straightforward date, but there are some ambiguities, beginning with when one starts the calculation.