gave a radio address entitled "Is Segregation Scriptural?" on station WMUU AM 1260 (the call letters stood for World's Most Unusual University).

That's a sea change for a university that has been a must-stop venue for every Republican since Ronald Reagan.* Since the 2000 controversy "a lot of candidates have shied away from us," university spokesman Brian Scoles said during a recent tour of the 210-acre campus.

"It's just the perception that remains." Bob Jones III acknowledged in a Nov.

Whatever may be the rationale for such private schools' policies, racial discrimination in education is contrary to public policy. (c) The IRS did not exceed its authority when it announced its interpretation of § 501(c)(3) in 19. J., delivered the opinion of the Court, in which BRENNAN, WHITE, MARSHALL, BLACKMUN, STEVENS, and O'CONNOR, JJ., joined, and in Part III of which POWELL, J., joined. The court permanently enjoined the Commissioner of [p579] Internal Revenue from approving tax-exempt status for any school in Mississippi that did not publicly maintain a policy of nondiscrimination. or educational purposes" was intended to express the basic common law concept [of "charity"]. Its purpose is "to conduct an institution [p580] of learning . giving special emphasis to the Christian religion and the ethics revealed in the Holy Scriptures." Certificate of Incorporation, Bob Jones University, Inc., of Greenville, S. Entering students are screened as to their religious beliefs, and their public and private conduct is strictly regulated by standards promulgated by University authorities. 1127 (DC 1970), the IRS formally notified the University of the change in IRS policy, and announced its intention to challenge the tax-exempt status of private schools practicing racial discrimination in their admissions policies. 725 (1974), in which this Court held that the Anti-Injunction Act of the Internal Revenue Code, 26 U. Thereafter, on April 16, 1975, the IRS notified the University of the proposed revocation of its tax-exempt status. housing and related facilities from which Americans are excluded because of their race, color, creed, or national origin is unfair, unjust, and inconsistent with the public policy of [p595] the United States as manifested in its Constitution and laws. In § 170 and § 501(c)(3), Congress has identified categories of traditionally exempt institutions and has specified certain additional requirements for tax exemption. 517(1) (1921), for example, the IRS's predecessor denied charitable exemptions on the basis of proscribed political activity before the Congress itself added such conduct as a disqualifying element. On the record before us, there can be no doubt as to the national policy. Clearly an educational institution engaging in [p599] practices affirmatively at odds with this declared position of the whole Government cannot be seen as exercising a "beneficial and stabilizing influenc[e] in community life," 397 U. at 673, and is not "charitable," within the meaning of § 170 and § 501(c)(3). Petitioner Goldsboro Christian Schools admits that it "maintain[s] racially discriminatory policies," Brief for Petitioner in No. 10, but seeks to justify those policies on grounds we have fully discussed. For example, the Bogerts state: In return for the favorable treatment accorded charitable gifts which imply some disadvantage to the community, the courts must find in the trust which is to be deemed "charitable" some real advantages to the public which more than offset the disadvantages arising out of special privileges accorded charitable trusts.

Racially discriminatory educational institutions cannot be viewed as conferring a public benefit within the above "charitable" concept or within the congressional intent underlying § 501(c)(3). Such interpretation is wholly consistent with what Congress, the Executive, and the courts had previously declared. (d) The Government's fundamental, overriding interest in eradicating racial discrimination in education substantially outweighs whatever burden denial of tax benefits places on petitioners' exercise of their religious beliefs. (e) The IRS properly applied its policy to both petitioners. POWELL, J., filed an opinion concurring in part and concurring in the judgment, TOP Opinion BURGER, C. Thereafter, in July, 1970, the IRS concluded that it could "no longer legally justify allowing tax-exempt status [under § 501(c)(3)] to private schools which practice racial discrimination." IRS News Release, July 7, 1970, reprinted in App. The revised policy on discrimination was formalized in Revenue Ruling 71-447, 1971-2 Cum. 230: Both the courts and the Internal Revenue Service have long recognized that the statutory requirement of being "organized and operated exclusively for religious, charitable, . The sponsors of the University genuinely believe that the Bible forbids interracial dating and marriage. The University continues to deny admission to applicants engaged in an interracial marriage or known to advocate interracial marriage or dating. After failing to obtain an assurance of tax exemption through administrative means, the University instituted an action in 1971 seeking to enjoin the IRS from revoking the school's tax-exempt status. On January 19, 1976, the IRS officially revoked the University's tax-exempt status, effective as of December 1, 1970, the day after the University was formally notified of the change in IRS policy. And in 1962, President Kennedy announced: [T]he granting of Federal assistance for . Yet the need for continuing interpretation of those statutes is unavoidable. In other instances, the IRS has denied charitable exemptions to otherwise qualified entities because they served too limited a class of people, and thus did not provide a truly "public" benefit under the common law test. In 1970, when the IRS first issued the ruling challenged here, the position of all three branches of the Federal Government was unmistakably clear. We therefore hold that the IRS did not exceed its authority when it announced its interpretation of § 170 and § 501(c)(3) in 19. That provision denies tax-exempt status to social clubs whose charters or policy statements provide for "discrimination against any person on the basis of race, color, or religion." Both the House and Senate Committee Reports on that bill articulated the national policy against granting tax exemptions to racially discriminatory private clubs. The IRS properly denied tax-exempt status to Goldsboro Christian Schools.

Bush got hammered for the lapse (as well as staying mum on the school's view of Catholicism as a "cult") and apologized.

The university has since dropped the interracial dating ban, but candidates have tended to avoid the campus.

From 1927 to 1933, Bob Jones College was located in Bay County Florida. In 1975, the University Board of Trustees authorized a change in policy to admit black students, but also expanded rules against interracial dating and marriage.

However, during the depression, students could not afford to attend college a long distance from home, so in 1933 BJU moved to Cleveland, Tennessee. In 1976, the Internal Revenue Service revoked the university's tax exemption retroactively to December 1, 1970 on grounds that it was practicing racial discrimination.

So far this year, the closest any candidate has come is Texas Gov.

Rick Perry, whose wife Anita made a low-key lunchtime visit to nursing students in mid-October.

In 2000, Bob Jones III dropped the interracial dating rule.