A matching is not stable if: In other words, a matching is stable when there does not exist any match (A, B) by which both A and B would be individually better off than they are with the element to which they are currently matched.The stable marriage problem has been stated as follows: Given n men and n women, where each person has ranked all members of the opposite sex in order of preference, marry the men and women together such that there are no two people of opposite sex who would both rather have each other than their current partners.

When there are no such pairs of people, the set of marriages is deemed stable.

Algorithms for finding solutions to the stable marriage problem have applications in a variety of real-world situations, perhaps the best known of these being in the assignment of graduating medical students to their first hospital appointments.

Not into the idea of creating a full-blown dating profile? As opposed to a matching algorithm that evaluates your answers to various questions, Tinder is all about first impressions — your photos are the most prominent part of your profile.

And it’s easy to get started: upload a few snaps from your Facebook profile, add an optional bio, and start swiping through other users in your area.

Each server prefers to serve users that it can with a lower cost, resulting in a (partial) preferential ordering of users for each server.

Content delivery networks that distribute much of the world's content and services solve this large and complex stable marriage problem between users and servers every tens of seconds to enable billions of users to be matched up with their respective servers that can provide the requested web pages, videos, or other services.

” and “What do you spend a lot of time thinking about?

”) but also lets you rate how important a potential match’s answers to those same questions are.

In mathematics, economics, and computer science, the stable marriage problem (also stable matching problem or SMP) is the problem of finding a stable matching between two equally sized sets of elements given an ordering of preferences for each element.