Evidence suggests that dating violence among high school students is more widespread than previously believed, and may have serious developmental consequences.Adolescents are especially vulnerable to this form of violence since it may interfere with two tasks that are integral to healthy social development: 1) establishing caring, meaningful relationships, and 2) developing interpersonal intimacy.Most of the practitioners in attendance — representing national organizations, schools and victim service community-based agencies — said that they primarily see female victims, and when they discuss teen dating violence with students, they hear that boys are the primary perpetrators. Because teen dating violence has only recently been recognized as a significant public health problem, the complex nature of this phenomenon is not fully understood.

Adolescents may be at even greater risk than adults for physical and psychological harm given their lack of experience, desire for independence, and reliance on support from inexperienced peers (Callahan, 2003).

These factors limit their ability to respond to violence and access effective intervention.

Violent relationships in adolescence can have serious ramifications for victims, putting them at higher risk for substance abuse, eating disorders, risky sexual behavior, suicide, and adult revictimization.

29 percent of girls who have been in a relationship said that they have been pressured to have sex or to engage in sexual activities that they did not want.

We need to do everything we can to make sure all students are safe.” What Is Teen Dating Violence? Associations of dating violence victimization with lifetime participation, co-occurrence, and early initiation of risk behaviors among U.

According to the Office on Violence Against Women at the U. Department of Justice, violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim is dating violence. Additionally, individuals who experience dating violence during adolescence may be at increased risk for continued interpersonal violence in adulthood both as victims and/or perpetrators.Although once narrowly conceptualized as involving only physical force, dating violence is now more broadly recognized as a continuum of abuse which can range from incidents of emotional and verbal abuse to rape and murder (Hickman et al, 2004). Dating violence against adolescent girls and associated substance use, unhealthy weight control, sexual risk behavior, pregnancy and suicidality. 1 in 3 female teenagers in a dating relationship has feared for her physical safety.Females ages 16 to 24 are more vulnerable to intimate partner violence than any other age group—at a rate almost triple the national average. Education policy brief: The imperative of developing teen dating violence prevention and intervention programs in secondary schools.Between 19, 22 percent of all homicides against females ages 16 to 19 were committed by an intimate partner. Southern California Review of Law and Women’s Studies, 12.